Author Archives: Giorgio Bertini

About Giorgio Bertini

Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++

Writing a Proposal for a Ph.D. Dissertation: Guidelines and Examples

This user-friendly guide helps students get started on–and complete–a successful doctoral dissertation proposal by accessibly explaining the process and breaking it down into manageable steps. Steven R. Terrell demonstrates how to write each chapter of the proposal, including the problem … Continue reading

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Mapping Your Thesis: Manual of Theory and Techniques for Masters and Doctoral Research

If this book provided a set of rules to be learned and applied, writing a thesis might seem pleasingly easy. But, because writing a thesis is seldom easy, the book instead offers a more complex mapping of the process. The … Continue reading

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A Qualitative Framework for Collecting and Analyzing Data in Focus Group Research

Despite the abundance of published material on conducting focus groups, scant specific information exists on how to analyze focus group data in social science research. Thus, the authors provide a new qualitative framework for collecting and analyzing focus group data. … Continue reading

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The social sciences and the web: From ‘Lurking’ to interdisciplinary ‘Big Data’ research

‘Big data’ is an area of growing research interest within sociology and numerous other disciplines. The rapid development of social media platforms and other web resources offer a vast and readily accessible repository of data associated with participants’ activities, attitudes … Continue reading

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Epistemological obstacles to interdisciplinary research

What causes interdisciplinary collaborations to default to the standard frameworks and methods of a single discipline, leaving collaborators feeling like they aren’t being taken seriously, or that what they’ve brought to the project has been left on the table, ignored … Continue reading

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Creating a Culture of Inquiry in the Classroom

For the moment let’s set aside the details associated with various methodologies and think about the core elements of the research process. In most cases, we begin with a problem and define the questions we want to answer. We find … Continue reading

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Engaged Urbanism: Cities and Methodologies

Engaged Urbanism: Cities and Methodologies is an imaginative foray into rethinking how scholars approach the city and challenging assumptions around urban research. It mirrors recent academic debate seeking to innovate in contemporary university conditions and attempts to make social research … Continue reading

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The Methodology for Inequality

How does the methodology of looking at disparities differ from methods as applied to other research efforts? Most of the econometric methodologies for looking at disparities use the same tools and techniques used in looking at inequality generally. The best … Continue reading

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Ethnography in a Time of Upheaval – Arab Spring

In this interview with Leila Zaki Chakravarti, sociologist Mona Abaza explores how the obstacles encountered by researchers doing fieldwork in enduring political upheavals are addressed in the context of contemporary Egypt. Chakravarti is a research fellow at the SOAS Centre … Continue reading

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Young People’s Constructions of Self: Use and Analysis of Photo Methods

The article examines the use of photo-elicitation methods in an ESRC-funded study of young consumers. Participants were asked to take photographs of consumer items that were significant to them. These were subsequently used in recorded interviews as a trigger to elicit the discussion … Continue reading

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