Taking back the playground

Taking back the playground

Traditional swings and slides may be safe, but they rob kids of chances to be creative, study finds. A five-year study tracking the habits of toddlers and preschoolers in playgrounds suggests an obsession with safety has forced kids into safe but sterile and uninspiring outdoor spaces that might satisfy adult anxieties and needs, but shortchange children’s development.

Instead of traditional swings and slides, the kids want places where they can hide, play with dirt and be creative. Susan Herrington, a professor in the University of B.C.’s School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, who led the study, said modern, trendy-looking playspaces may be safe and the equipment is sturdy, but they leave nothing for childish imaginations.

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About Giorgio Bertini

Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++
This entry was posted in Creativity, Imagination and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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